Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia

Sexual Evocation

Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia

In 1904, Aleister Crowley commissioned, edited, and introduced an English translation of The Book of Goetia of Solomon the King, the first of five magical texts known as the Lemegaton. Yet, few have actually worked the system, believing one must con-form blindly to the archaic procedures and long-winded conjurations of the original text. But Crowley's attitude toward the Goetia appears to have been different. His masterful expansion and perfection of the "Preliminary Invocation of the Goetia" -- is a prime example. Now, Christopher Hyatt has joined with Lon Milo DuQuette and David P Wilson to glean extraordinary magical and philosophical treasures from this most misunderstood subject.

Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia

Aleister Crowley's Illustrated Goetia

Goetia [refers to] all the operations of that Magick which deals with gross, malignant or unenlightened forces. Goetia is sometimes thought of as a wild card, something that can get out of control, something which expresses the operator's lower desires to control others and improve his own personal life. And, in fact, this potential loss of control, this danger, the desire for self improvement and great power is exactly what attracts many people to Goetia while horrifying and repelling others. Crowley's Goetia is brought to life with vivid illustrations of the demons. Commentary by DuQuette and Hyatt bring the ancient arts into the modern day.

The Magick of Aleister Crowley

A Handbook of the Rituals of Thelema

The Magick of Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley's ascension into the pantheon of alternative gurus was cemented by his appearance on The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover. Unfortunately, he was known more for his reputation as "The Beast 666" and "The Wickedest Man in the World." All well and good for publicity, but this infamy eclipsed his teachings, as did his technical and opaque writing style, meant more for adepts contemporary to him than the average modern reader. Enter Lon Milo DuQuette to decipher and explain Crowley's texts and more important rituals. Formerly titled The Magick of Thelema, this revised edition features extensive corrections, a new introduction, and a new ritual, "The Rites of Eleusis." This is the perfect introductory text for readers who wonder what the works--rather than the myth--of Aleister Crowley are all about. DuQuette takes the mystery out of both the rituals themselves and Crowley's writing in this modern grimoire. Step by step, he presents a course of study in plain English, with examples of rituals and explanations of their significance. DuQuette also includes a course of study for Crowley's original works with an extensive bibliography and fastidious footnotes.

My Life With The Spirits

The Adventures of a Modern Magician

My Life With The Spirits

A rare glimpse into the fascinating, sometimes terrifying, sometimes hilarious world of a modern ceremonial magician. Hailed by critics as the most entertaining author and one of the most widely respected members of the magick community, Lon Milo DuQuette provides a beacon for aspiring magicians everywhere. Illustrated. Index

Angels, Demons & Gods of the New Millennium

Musings on Modern Magick

Angels, Demons & Gods of the New Millennium

A delightfully entertaining liberal arts education in Western Hermeticism with one of America's most knowledgeable and engaging authorities! Each chapter is a self-contained monograph on one of 7 topics critical tounderstanding modern magick.

God & the Gothic

Religion, Romance, & Reality in the English Literary Tradition

God & the Gothic

God and the Gothic: Romance and Reality in the English Literary Tradition provides a complete reimagining of the Gothic literary canon to examine its engagement with theological ideas, tracing its origins to the apocalyptic critique of the Reformation female martyrs, and to the Dissolution of the monasteries, now seen as usurping authorities. A double gesture of repudiation and regret is evident in the consequent search for political, aesthetic, and religious mediation, which characterizes the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution and Whig Providential discourse. Part one interprets eighteenth-century Gothic novels in terms of this Whig debate about the true heir, culminating in Ann Radcliffe's melancholic theology which uses distance and loss to enable a new mediation. Part two traces the origins of the doppelgänger in Calvinist anthropology and establishes that its employment by a range of Scottish writers offers a productive mode of subjectivity, necessary in a culture equally concerned with historical continuity. In part three, Irish Gothic is shown to be seeking ways to mediate between Catholic and Protestant identities through models of sacrifice and ecumenism, while in part four nineteenth-century Gothic is read as increasingly theological, responding to materialism by a project of re-enchantment. Ghost story writers assert the metaphysical priority of the supernatural to establish the material world. Arthur Machen and other Order of the Golden Dawn members explore the double and other Gothic tropes as modes of mystical ascent, while raising the physical to the spiritual through magical control, and the M. R. James circle restore the sacramental and psychical efficacy of objects.

Aleister Crowley: A Visual Study

Aleister Crowley: A Visual Study

The infamous occult practitioner, Edward Alexander "Aleister" Crowley has cast a long shadow over the history and culture of the 20th century. The information included in Aleister Crowley: A Visual Study illustrates this fact. As the foremost accumulator of occult knowledge in the late 19th and early 20th Century, Crowley based his writings upon prior magicians, writers, and philosophers, incorporating their ideas, and his own, into a new religion for a New Age. This book details Crowley’s progression from a self–described childhood in hell, to notorious magician, to drug-addled middle age as the Great Beast, and on to his final years living in an upscale boarding house in southern England. As this visual study confirms, a copious amount of photographic and newspaper evidence still remains concerning the Beast 666-Aleister Crowley.

Gems from the Equinox

Instructions by Aleister Crowley for His Own Magical Order

Gems from the Equinox

In the original ten volumes of the Equinox, Alesiter Crowley succeeded in synthesizing the aim of religion and the method of science. Israel Regardie's selections in Gems of the Equinox make a volume that is invaluable to readers, students, and adepts. It includes material on Crowley's magical order, magical rituals, yoga, invocations, and sex magick, among many other topics. Gems from the Equinox is a unique resource that serves as a veritable textbook for the magickal orders AA and O.T.O. Although it is written for the advanced practitioner, beginners will gain much from its many pages of wisdom, including yoga postures and breathing techniques, ceremonial rituals and meditations, an Enochian magick primer, and The Book of the Law. In Gems from the Equinox, Israel Regardie's selections of Aleister Crowley's writings synthesize the aim of religion and the method of science, making it invaluable to readers, students, and adepts. Gems is a must have for every student of Occultism, Mysticism, Thelema, Magick, and comparative religion.

Aleister Crowley and the Practice of the Magical Diary

Aleister Crowley and the Practice of the Magical Diary

This important collection includes Aleister Crowley's two most important instructional writings on the design and purpose of the magical diary, John St. John and A Master of the Temple. These were the only two works regarding the magical diary published in Crowley's lifetime. Both were first published in Crowley's immense collection of magical instruction, The Equinox. John St. John chronicles Crowley's moment-by-moment progress during a 13-day magical working. Crowley referred to it as "a perfect model of what a magical record should be." A Master of the Temple is taken from the magical diary of Frater Achad at a time when he was Crowley's most valued and successful student. It provides an invaluable example of a student's record, plus direct commentary and instruction added by Crowley. With commentary and introductory material by editor James Wasserman, Aleister Crowley and the Practice of the Magical Diary is the most important and accessible instruction available to students of the occult regarding the practice of keeping a magical diary. This revised edition includes a new introduction by Wasserman, a foreword by noted occult scholar J. Daniel Gunther, revisions throughout the text, a revised reading list for further study, plus Crowley's instructions on banishing from Liber O.