Avicenna’s Medicine

A New Translation of the 11th-Century Canon with Practical Applications for Integrative Health Care

Avicenna’s Medicine

The first contemporary translation of the 1,000-year-old text at the foundation of modern medicine and biology • Presents the actual words of Avicenna translated directly from the original Arabic, removing the inaccuracies and errors of most translators • Explains current medical interpretations and ways to apply Avicenna’s concepts today, particularly for individualized medicine • Reveals how Avicenna’s understanding of the “humors” corresponds directly with the biomedical classes known today as proteins, lipids, and organic acids A millennium after his life, Avicenna remains one of the most highly regarded physicians of all time. His Canon of Medicine, also known as the Qanun, is one of the most famous and influential books in the history of medicine, forming the basis for our modern understanding of human health and disease. It focused not simply on the treatment of symptoms, but on finding the cause of illness through humoral diagnosis—a method still used in traditional Unani and Ayurvedic medicines in India. Originally written in Arabic, Avicenna’s Canon was long ago translated into Latin, Persian, and Urdu, yet many of the inaccuracies from those first translations linger in current English translations. Translated directly from the original Arabic, this volume includes detailed commentary to explain current biomedical interpretations of Avicenna’s theories and ways to apply his treatments today, particularly for individualized medicine. It shows how Avicenna’s understanding of the humors corresponds directly with the biomedical definition of proteins, lipids, and organic acids: the nutrient building blocks of our blood and body. With this new translation of the first volume of his monumental work, Avicenna’s Canon becomes just as relevant today as it was 1,000 years ago.

Avicenna

Avicenna

Ibn Sina - Avicenna in Latin - (980-1037) played a considerable role in the development of both eastern and western philosophy and science. This book provides a general introduction to Avicenna's intellectual system and offer a careful philosophical analysis of most of the major aspects of his thought.

The 50 Most Significant Individuals in Recorded History

The 50 Most Significant Individuals in Recorded History

This book contains a subjective ranking of the 50 most significant men and women throughout recorded history. The author, Stan Russo, conducted more than four years of meticulous research on 500 important figures throughout the ages before settling on this list. Each person's reasons for inclusion are described in a countdown format leading up to the most significant individual. The book not only provided an educational and entertaining look at numerous cultures and time periods in the process but also builds suspense with each page as readers guess which person comes next and why. After the top ranked name is revealed, the author then provides his rationale for why other famous men and women did not make the cut. This book is an excellent resource for educators and all fans of history by serving as a starting point for further debate and discussion. Reintroduce the fun back into historical studies. Learn about individuals who might otherwise have gone unrecognized. See if your own favorite figures from history made the list. Whether you agree or disagree with the choices and the order they are listed in, you'll think about history in new ways.

Interpreting Avicenna

Critical Essays

Interpreting Avicenna

Avicenna is the greatest philosopher of the Islamic world. His immense impact on Christian and Jewish medieval thought, as well as on the subsequent Islamic tradition, is charted in this volume alongside studies which provide a comprehensive introduction to and analysis of his philosophy. Contributions from leading scholars address a wide range of topics including Avicenna's life and works, conception of philosophy and achievement in logic and medicine. His ideas in the main areas of philosophy, such as epistemology, philosophy of religion and physics, are also analyzed. While serving as a general introduction to Avicenna's thought, this collection of critical essays also represents the cutting edge of scholarship on this most influential philosopher of the medieval era.

The 'Arabick' Interest of the Natural Philosophers in Seventeenth-Century England

The 'Arabick' Interest of the Natural Philosophers in Seventeenth-Century England

"The 'Arabick' Interest of the Natural Philosophers in Seventeenth-Century England" deals with the remarkably widespread interest in Arabic in seventeenth-century England among Biblical scholars and theologians, natural philosophers and Fellows of the Royal Society, and others. It led to the institutionalisation of Arabic studies at Oxford and Cambridge Universities where Arabic chairs were set up, and immense manuscript collections were established and utilised. Fourteen historians examine the extent and sources of this Arabic interest in areas ranging from religion, astronomy, mathematics, medicine, philosophy, philology, and alchemy to botany. Arabic is shown to have been a significant component of the rise of Protestant intellectual tradition and the evolution of secular scholarship at universities.

The Trias of Maimonides / Die Trias des Maimonides

Jewish, Arabic, and Ancient Culture of Knowledge / Jüdische, arabische und antike Wissenskultur

The Trias of Maimonides / Die Trias des Maimonides

Jewish religion, Greek philosophy and Islamic thought mold the philosophy and theology of Maimonides and characterize his work as an excellent example of the fruitful transfer of culture in the Middle Ages. The authors show various aspects of this cultural cross-fertilization, despite religious and ethnic differences. The studies prompt thoughts on a question which is important for the present and the future: How may the different religions, cultures and concepts of knowledge continue to be conveyed in synthesis? The volume publishes the lectures given at the July 2004 international congress at the occasion of the 800th anniversary of Maimonides’ death.

A Brief History of Medicine

From Hippocrates to Gene Therapy

A Brief History of Medicine

Paul Strathern follows the development of medicine through the lives of its greatest practitioners, whose discoveries (and errors) shaped the course of medical history. Includes geniuses, such as Paracelsus, the father of medical chemistry, and Edward Jenner, whose vaccination banished smallpox, scientific endeavour, such as the discovery of X-rays, and mistakes both fortunate and fatal. With grave robbing, plague and germ theory, quackery, nursing, syphilis, micro-organisms and penicillin along the way, this is the ultimate story of human -- and humane -- achievement.