The New Architecture and the Bauhaus

The New Architecture and the Bauhaus

One of the most important books on the modernist movement in architecture, written by a founder of the Bauhaus school. One of the most important books on the modern movement in architecture, The New Architecture and The Bauhaus poses some of the fundamental problems presented by the relations of art and industry and considers their possible, practical solution. Gropius traces the rise of the New Architecture and the work of the now famous Bauhaus and, with splendid clarity, calls for a new artist and architect educated to new materials and techniques and directly confronting the requirements of the age.

Bauhaus 1919-1933

Workshops for Modernity

Bauhaus 1919-1933

The Bauhaus, the school of art and design founded in Germany in 1919 and shut down by the Nazis in 1933, brought together artists, architects and designers in an extraordinary conversation about modern art. Bauhaus 19191933, published to accompany a major multimedia exhibition at MoMA, is the first comprehensive treatment of the subject by MoMA since 1938 and offers a new generational perspective on the 20th centurys most influential experiment in artistic education. It brings together works in a broad range of mediums, including industrial design, furniture, architecture, graphics, photography, textiles, ceramics, theatre and costume design, and painting and sculpture many of which have rarely if ever been seen outside of Germany. Featuring about 400 colour plates and a rich range of documentary images, this publication includes two overarching images by the exhibitions curators, Leah Dickerman and Barry Bergdoll, concise interpretive essays on key objects by over twenty leading scholars, and an illustrated, narrative chronology.

Bauhaus

Bauhaus

The Bauhaus movement (meaning the “house of building”) developed in three German cities - it began in Weimar between 1919 and 1925, then continued in Dessau, from 1925 to 1932, and finally ended in 1932-1933 in Berlin. Three leaders presided over the growth of the movement: Walter Gropius, from 1919 to 1928, Hannes Meyer, from 1928 to 1930, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, from 1930 to 1933. Founded by Gropius in the rather conservative city of Weimar, the new capital of Germany, which had just been defeated by the other European nations in the First World War, the movement became a flamboyant response to this humiliation. Combining new styles in architecture, design, and painting, the Bauhaus aspired to be an expression of a generational utopia, striving to free artists facing a society that remained conservative in spite of the revolutionary efforts of the post-war period. Using the most modern materials, the Bauhaus was born out of the precepts of William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement, introducing new forms, inspired by the most ordinary of objects, into everyday life. The shuttering of the center in Berlin by the Nazis in 1933 did not put an end to the movement, since many of its members chose the path of exile and established themselves in the United States. Although they all went in different directions artistically, their work shared the same origin. The most influential among the Bauhaus artists were Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Lyonel Feininger, Ludwig Hilberseimer, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandisky, and Lothar Schreyer. Through a series of beautiful reproductions, this work provides an overview of the Bauhaus era, including the history, influence, and major figures of this revolutionary movement, which turned everyday life into art.

The Bauhaus Idea and Bauhaus Politics

The Bauhaus Idea and Bauhaus Politics

Art historian Éva Forgács's book is an unusual take on the Bauhaus. She examines the school as shaped by the great forces of history as well as the personal dynamism of its faculty and students. The book focuses on the idea of the Bauhaus - the notion that the artist should be involved in the technological innovations of mechanization and mass production - rather than on its artefacts. Founded in 1919 by the architect Walter Gropius and closed down by the Nazis in 1933, the Bauhaus had to struggle through the years of Weimar Germany not only with its political foes but also with the often-diverging personal ambitions and concepts within its own ranks. It is the inner conflicts and their solutions, the continuous modification of the original Bauhaus idea by politics within and without, that make the history of the school and Forgács's account of it dramatic.

The Story of the Bauhaus

The Story of the Bauhaus

Now 100 years old, the Bauhaus still looks just as fresh today as it did when it began. It was a place to experiment and embrace a new creative freedom. Thanks to this philosophy, the Bauhaus still shapes the world around us. Trace The Story of the Bauhaus through the 100 personalities, designs, ideas and events that shaped this monumental movement. Learn about leaders Paul Klee, Walter Gropius, Anni Albers and Wassily Kandinsky; witness groundbreaking events and wild parties that would revolutionise contemporary design; and discover a range of innovative ideas and new ways of thinking.

The Bauhaus and America

First Contacts, 1919-1936

The Bauhaus and America

An historical exploration of the Bauhaus--having existed for only fourteen years and boasting fewer than 1,300 students--assesses the school's influence throughout the world in numerous buildings, art-works, objects, concepts, and curricula. Reprint.

The Gendered World of the Bauhaus

The Politics of Power at the Weimar Republic's Premier Art Institute, 1919-1932

The Gendered World of the Bauhaus

Enth. u.a.: S. 150-155: The female circle versus the male square: order and art in the thinking of Johannes Itten. - S. 155-163: The role of sexuality in the thinking of Paul Klee: "Genius is switching on energy, sperm."