Ego and Archetype

Ego and Archetype

This book is about the individual's journey to psychological wholeness, known in analytical psychology as the process of individuation. Edward Edinger traces the stages in this process and relates them to the search for meaning through encounters with symbolism in religion, myth, dreams, and art. For contemporary men and women, Edinger believes, the encounter with the self is equivalent to the discovery of God. The result of the dialogue between the ego and the archetypal image of God is an experience that dramatically changes the individual's worldview and makes possible a new and more meaningful way of life.

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

This ninth volume of C.G.Jung's collected writings is devoted to his chief works on the concept of the collective unconscious and its correlate, that of the archetypes. Part 1 contains essays describing and elaborating upon the two concepts, and Part 2, entitled Aion and published separately, is devoted to an extended monograph on the archetype of the self as revealed in the "Christian aeon."

Metaphors of Conciousness

Metaphors of Conciousness

As we move into the 1980s, there is an increasing awareness that our civilization is going through a profound cultural transformation. At the heart of this transformation lies what is often called a "paradigm shift"-a dramatic change in the thoughts, perceptions, and values which form a particular vision of reality. The paradigm that is now shifting comprises a large number of ideas and values that have dominated our society for several hundred years; values that have been associated with various streams of Western culture, among them the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century, The Enlightenment, and the Industrial Revolution. They include the belief in the scientific method as the only valid approach to knowledge, the split between mind and matter, the view of nature as a mechanical system, the view of life in society as a competitive struggle for survival, and the belief in unlimited material progress to be achieved through economic and technological growth. All these ideas and values are now found to be severely limited and in need of radical revision.

Hero-ego in Search of Self

A Jungian Reading of Beowulf

Hero-ego in Search of Self

In "Hero-Ego in Search of Self," Judy Anne White offers a perceptive explanation for continued interest in the Anglo-Saxon poem "Beowulf." Building upon the earlier work of Jeffery Helterman and John Miles Foley, she argues that the sum of all confrontations between hero and monster in Beowulf equals the process of individual psychological development identified by Carl Jung as individuation. Dr. White's study proposes that the hero's struggle is the universal struggle towards self-knowledge - and that "Beowulf" thus resonates for the contemporary reader as it did for the poet's original audience.

The Complex

Path of Transformation from Archetype to Ego

The Complex

This is title no. 98 in the series Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts. Erel Shalit provides a conceptual scaffold that allows an examination of the inner structures and assumptions that underpin actions, discussions, loves, and hates. If one is hopeful of building an overview of personal and collective heritage and thus gain some measure of self-determination, one must enter into the dim light of the inner framework and learn its layout.

Jungian Dream Interpretation

A Handbook of Theory and Practice

Jungian Dream Interpretation

Comprehensive guide to an understanding of dreams in light of the basic principles of analytical psychology. Particular attention to common motifs, the role of complexes, and the goal and purpose of dreams.

Practical Solitary Magic

Practical Solitary Magic

Many students don't want to be tied to a particular group or spiritual tradition, but prefer to search, experiment, and grow on their own; this book is perfect for these people. Watson discusses the principles that underlie magical practice in a veryeasy-to-understand manner. She includes information on affirmations, visualization, spiritual practices, folk magic, and ritual. Safety measures and ethical considerations are stressed throughout. Bibliography, index.

Using Superheroes in Counseling and Play Therapy

Using Superheroes in Counseling and Play Therapy

Harness the Therapeutic Power of the Superhero! Application of the Star Wars Adoption Narrative Emotional Literacy and the Incredible Hulk Batman and Trauma What Would Superman Do--An Adlerian Approach? With an incisive historical foreword by John Shelton Lawrence and insight from contributors such as Michael Brody, Patty Scanlon, and Roger Kaufman, Lawrence Rubin takes us on a dynamic tour of the benefits of using these icons of popular culture and fantasy in counseling and play therapy. Not only can superheroes assist in clinical work with children, but Rubin demonstrates how they can facilitate growth and change with teen and adults. Early childhood memories of how we felt pretending to have the power to save the world or our families in the face of impending danger still resonate in our adult lives, making the use of superheroes attractive as well, to the creative counselor. In presenting case studies and wisdom gleaned from practicing therapists' experience, Lawrence Rubin shows how it is possible to uncover children's secret identities, assist treatment of adolescents with sexual behavior problems, and inspire the journey of individuation for gay and lesbian clients, all by paying attention to our intrinsic social need for superhero fantasy and play.

Between Two Ages

The 21St Century and the Crisis of Meaning

Between Two Ages

"In Between Two Ages, Van Wishard has provided us with a masterful synthesis of the main currents of history, ranging over the centuries with an experts eye to identify the key trends in economics, technology and culture that have led us to this place in time. By itself, this would be an important contribution to our understanding. But the true significance of Between Two Ages lies in his placing this analysis within a profoundly moral and ethical framework. Van Wishard has not simply diagnosed the reasons for our spiritual malaise. He has also suggested how each of us can overcome this malaise and find a larger purpose or meaning to our lives. From the foreword by Dr. Mitchell B. Reiss Dean of International Affairs College of William & Mary Introduction Despite the stratospheric heights of the Dow in recent years, the allure of prosperity and the astounding possibilities opening up for human fulfillment, the next three decades could be the most decisive 30-year period in the history of mankind. Thus you and I are living in the midst of perhaps the most uncertain period America has ever known -- more difficult than World War II, the Depression or even the Civil War. With these earlier crises, an immediately identifiable, focused emergency existed, an emergency people could see and mobilize to combat. But the crisis today is of a different character and order. For America is at the vortex of a global cyclone of change so vast and deep that it is uprooting established institutions, altering centuries-old relationships, changing underlying mores and attitudes, and now, so the experts tell us, even threatening the continued existence of the human species. It is not simply change at the margins; it is change at the very core of life. Culture-smashing change. Identity-shattering change. Soul-crushing change. Prior generations faced change within a context of stable institutions that functioned more or less effectively. Earlier generations had a more stableif less comfortableframework, as well as more clearly defined reference points. Our era doesnt have such guides, for all of Americas institutions, from government to family, from business to religion, are in upheaval. The past century has seen civilized life increasingly ripped from its moorings. The immutable certainties that anchored our ancestors no longer seem to hold in a world where the tectonic plates of life are clashing, where human antagonisms obliterate tens of thousands of people in Africa, Bosnia or Chechnya in a matter of a few days or weeks, where a stray bullet ends the life of an elderly lady quietly walking home from church in Washington, D.C. In so many ways, a life that has lost its essential meaning has cut giant swaths across humanity. Clearly, we have been standing at a unique historical dividing line -- the end of the modern era, as well as the Industrial Age, the end of the colonial period, the end of the Atlantic-based economic, political and military global hegemony, the end of Americas culture being drawn primarily from European sources, the end of the masculine patriarchal/hierarchical epoch, and as Joseph Campbell suggests, the end of the Christian eon. Obviously, one era doesnt stop and a new one start in a week. Yearseven decades or generationsof overlap take place. The sense of an age ending and something new emerging was evident during the earliest years of the 20th century. In 1913, Harvard philosopher George Santayana noted: "The civilization characteristic of Christendom has not yet disappeared, yet another civilization has begun to take its place." In 1928, at the height of the "Roaring Twenties," historian Will Durant wrote, "Human conduct and belief are now undergoing transformations profounder and more disturbing than any since the appearance of wealth and philosophy put an end to the tradition

The Knowledge That Leads to Wholeness

Gnostic Myths Behind Jung's Theory of Individuation

The Knowledge That Leads to Wholeness

The Knowledge that Leads to Wholeness is the first book to specifically illustrate how the major Gnostic myths underlie Jungs theory of individuation. It is a compelling and in-depth examination of a life-changing journey that begins with the author discovering the forgotten secrets of the Gnostics. These secrets are gradually unveiled as the author and his loyal dog, Gold, are initiated, each in their own way, to put the ancient knowledge into practice. Dr. Lloyd explores the esoteric side of Carl Jung and reveals the connections between Jungs pivotal theory of individuation, i.e. the journey to wholeness, and the powerful, visionary myths told by the pioneers of the psyche, the Gnostics. He details what happens to a person who is on the road to wholeness, how the person will change, and how a new divine-human identity will be born into the world as a result of undertaking this transformational odyssey. -KIRKUS DISCOVERIES Review - Did Carl Jungs principles of psychology have Gnostic origins? A Marine Corps Ph.D. explores the complex mystical possibilities. Lloyd splits his expansive hypothesis of the souls journey into three vital steps (preparation, undertaking and re-birth) in discovering Jungs path to wholeness. He credits Jung with saving his life by way of unlocking his imagination (the souls voice) and spiritual mindset. The author familiarizes readers with the Gnostic religious movement, practitioners of an intensely spiritual inner exploration, who believed that humans are not bound to experiences solely of the body and mind. His literary gift to Jung is these comparative ruminations, all exuding a great amount of imagination and provocative thought. Running parallel to the authors spiritually progressive interests is his adventuresome interaction with and imaginal dog named Gold, who discovers two seeds of knowledge. The first rediscovers the spark of divine life, whereby humans are one and the same with God, and the second amplifies Jungs individuation theory that the human ego must relate to the unconscious mind to achieve psychological health. Unerringly throughout his narrative, Lloyd grafts Gnostic myths with Jungian wisdom. He focuses on the psychic creator and king of the material world Demiurge in association with second-century Gnostic visionary Valentinus, whose tragic myth of Sophia tells of a restless female deity who travels outside of herself searching for wholeness rather than looking inward, and her ultimate repentance. Comparatively, Jung also writes of humans who restrict themselves to their five senses rather than tapping into the core strength of their imaginative visions where uncanny experiences might spring forth. As Lloyd (and Gold) survey principles of higher consciousness, the self, the transformative life-cycle process, and the concluding Syrian lyrical myth Song of the Pearl as they are juxtaposed against Jungs theories, the author also cites Gnostic challenges to contemporary religious beliefs as in the re-imagined genesis of Jesus of Nazareth. Most interestingly, Lloyd inserts Jung into his narrative to quiz his arbiters as to whether they have the desire to discover the mystery of their existence. Unfiltered hokum for some, but those who are open to it will find much-needed nourishment and direction for their searching souls. --Nielsen Business Media, 770 Broadway, New York, NY 10003 646-654-7277 fax 646-654-4706 [email protected] Visit www.robertcharleslloyd.com