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God and Reason in the Middle Ages

This book shows how the Age of Reason actually began during the late Middle Ages.

Author : Edward Grant

Release : 2001-07-30

Publisher : Cambridge University Press

ISBN : 9780521003377

File Size : 23.43 MB

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This book shows how the Age of Reason actually began during the late Middle Ages.

The Nature of Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages (Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy, Volume 52)

In this volume, distinguished scholar Edward Grant identifies the vital elements that contributed to the creation of a widespread interest in natural philosophy, which has been characterized as the "Great Mother of the Sciences."

Author : Edward Grant

Release : 2010-04-05

Publisher : CUA Press

ISBN : 0813217385

File Size : 81.95 MB

Format : PDF

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In this volume, distinguished scholar Edward Grant identifies the vital elements that contributed to the creation of a widespread interest in natural philosophy, which has been characterized as the "Great Mother of the Sciences."

God and the Goddesses

God and the Goddesses is a study in medieval imaginative theology, examining the numerous daughters of God who appear in allegorical poems, theological fictions, and the visions of holy women.

Author : Barbara Newman

Release : 2016-01-14

Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN : 9780812202915

File Size : 90.95 MB

Format : PDF

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Contrary to popular belief, the medieval religious imagination did not restrict itself to masculine images of God but envisaged the divine in multiple forms. In fact, the God of medieval Christendom was the Father of only one Son but many daughters—including Lady Philosophy, Lady Love, Dame Nature, and Eternal Wisdom. God and the Goddesses is a study in medieval imaginative theology, examining the numerous daughters of God who appear in allegorical poems, theological fictions, and the visions of holy women. We have tended to understand these deities as mere personifications and poetic figures, but that, Barbara Newman contends, is a mistake. These goddesses are neither pagan survivals nor versions of the Great Goddess constructed in archetypal psychology, but distinctive creations of the Christian imagination. As emanations of the Divine, mediators between God and the cosmos, embodied universals, and ravishing objects of identification and desire, medieval goddesses transformed and deepened Christendom's concept of God, introducing religious possibilities beyond the ambit of scholastic theology and bringing them to vibrant imaginative life. Building a bridge between secular and religious conceptions of allegorized female power, Newman advances such questions as whether medieval writers believed in their goddesses and, if so, in what manner. She investigates whether the personifications encountered in poetic fictions can be distinguished from those that appear in religious visions and questions how medieval writers reconcile their statements about the multiple daughters of God with orthodox devotion to the Son of God. Furthermore, she examines why forms of feminine God-talk that strike many Christians today as subversive or heretical did not threaten medieval churchmen. Weaving together such disparate texts as the writings of Latin and vernacular poets, medieval schoolmen, liturgists, and male and female mystics and visionaries, God and the Goddesses is a direct challenge to modern theologians to reconsider the role of goddesses in the Christian tradition.

History of Theology: The Middle Ages

At last, a thorough, balanced, and readable history of medieval theology for nonspecialist readers! This is that book we so often ask for and so seldom get: written by a scholar for everyone to read.

Author : Angelo Di Berardino

Release : 1996

Publisher : Liturgical Press

ISBN : 9780814659168

File Size : 40.69 MB

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2009 Catholic Press Association Award Winner! At last, a thorough, balanced, and readable history of medieval theology for nonspecialist readers! This is that book we so often ask for and so seldom get: written by a scholar for everyone to read. Giulio D 'Onofrio, a historian of philosophy and theology, uses his deep and broad-ranging knowledge of the thought of the scholars (Christian, Jewish, and Muslim) of the Middle Ages to describe in a thoroughly readable style the development of ideas from the beginnings of what can rightly be called Western culture to the Renaissance and the eve of the Reformation. No longer can medieval theology be regarded as merely Thomas Aquinas and Bonaventure with appendages fore and aft. This book is a page-turner, as readers are continually invited to join scholars and mystics of another age in the perennial pursuit of faith seeking understanding. It is this quest for a synthesis of faith and reason that guided the medieval thinkers and is the unifying thread running through this book. Readers follow as the Roman world of thought gives way to a Christian world whose philosophy builds on that of Greeks and Romans. That early phase in turn yields to the era of the monastic and cathedral schools, where Christian learning was nurtured until the rise of the universities. In that high flowering, the encounter with Jewish and Arabic thought brought a new energy that issued not only in the work of great masters like Thomas and Bonaventure but also in a flowering of mysticism. Along the way, the great controversies of the era sparked new thinking and new learning, as suppressions of thought proved only temporary setbacks and correctives on the way to greater understanding. Matthew O 'Connell's translation is masterful. Readers will be captivated as much by his lucid and readable English as by D 'Onofrio's clear presentation. It is a work of great merit that should be on the shelf, and frequently in the hand, of everyone who is at all curious about how human beings in the past, as in the present, have sought to understand the faith that is in them. Giulio d 'Onofrio teaches the history of medieval philosophy at the University of Salerno, Italy, and also teaches the history of medieval philosophy, Latin, and the exegesis of philosophical texts at the Pontifical Lateran University. He is the editor of Volume III, The Renaissance,in this series.

God's Philosophers

Introduction – The Truth about Science in the Middle Ages 1 Issac Newton, letter
to Robert Hooke, 5 February 1676, cited in Richard ... 5 Edward Grant, God and
Reason in the Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), p.

Author : James Hannam

Release : 2009-08-07

Publisher : Icon Books Ltd

ISBN : 1848311583

File Size : 38.97 MB

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This is a powerful and a thrilling narrative history revealing the roots of modern science in the medieval world. The adjective 'medieval' has become a synonym for brutality and uncivilized behavior. Yet without the work of medieval scholars there could have been no Galileo, no Newton and no Scientific Revolution. In "God's Philosophers", James Hannam debunks many of the myths about the Middle Ages, showing that medieval people did not think the earth is flat, nor did Columbus 'prove' that it is a sphere; the Inquisition burnt nobody for their science nor was Copernicus afraid of persecution; no Pope tried to ban human dissection or the number zero. "God's Philosophers" is a celebration of the forgotten scientific achievements of the Middle Ages - advances which were often made thanks to, rather than in spite of, the influence of Christianity and Islam. Decisive progress was also made in technology: spectacles and the mechanical clock, for instance, were both invented in thirteenth-century Europe. Charting an epic journey through six centuries of history, "God's Philosophers" brings back to light the discoveries of neglected geniuses like John Buridan, Nicole Oresme and Thomas Bradwardine, as well as putting into context the contributions of more familiar figures like Roger Bacon, William of Ockham and Saint Thomas Aquinas.

Science and Religion

Evans, Gillian R. Philosophy and Theology in the Middle Ages. London:
Routledge, 1993. Fletcher, John M. “Some Considerations of the Role of the
Teaching of Philosophy in the Medieval Universities. ... God and Reason in the
Middle Ages.

Author : Gary B. Ferngren

Release : 2013-06-17

Publisher : JHU Press

ISBN : 1421412829

File Size : 75.44 MB

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Written by distinguished historians of science and religion, the thirty essays in this volume survey the relationship of Western religious traditions to science from the beginning of the Christian era to the late twentieth century. This wide-ranging collection also introduces a variety of approaches to understanding their intersection, suggesting a model not of inalterable conflict, but of complex interaction. Tracing the rise of science from its birth in the medieval West through the scientific revolution, the contributors describe major shifts that were marked by discoveries such as those of Copernicus, Galileo, and Isaac Newton and the Catholic and Protestant reactions to them. They assess changes in scientific understanding brought about by eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transformations in geology, cosmology, and biology, together with the responses of both mainstream religious groups and such newer movements as evangelicalism and fundamentalism. The book also treats the theological implications of contemporary science and evaluates recent approaches such as environmentalism, gender studies, social construction, and postmodernism, which are at the center of current debates in the historiography, understanding, and application of science. Contributors: Colin A. Russell, David B. Wilson, Edward Grant, David C. Lindberg, Alnoor Dhanani, Owen Gingerich, Richard J. Blackwell, Edward B. Davis, Michael P. Winship, John Henry, Margaret J. Osler, Richard S. Westfall, John Hedley Brooke, Nicolaas A. Rupke, Peter M. Hess, James Moore, Peter J. Bowler, Ronald L. Numbers, Steven J. Harris, Mark A. Noll, Edward J. Larson, Richard Olson, Craig Sean McConnell, Robin Collins, William A. Dembski, David N. Livingstone, Sara Miles, and Stephen P. Weldon.

The Legend of the Middle Ages

Featuring a penetrating interview and sixteen essays only three of which have previously appeared in English this volume explores key intersections of medieval religion and philosophy.

Author : Rémi Brague

Release : 2009-04-15

Publisher : University of Chicago Press

ISBN : 0226070808

File Size : 59.77 MB

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Modern interpreters have variously cast the Middle Ages as a benighted past from which the West had to evolve and, more recently, as the model for a potential future of intercultural dialogue and tolerance. The Legend of the Middle Ages cuts through such oversimplifications to reconstruct a complicated and philosophically rich period that remains deeply relevant to the contemporary world. Featuring a penetrating interview and sixteen essays only three of which have previously appeared in English this volume explores key intersections of medieval religion and philosophy. With characteristic erudition and insight, Remi Brague focuses less on individual Christian, Jewish, and Muslim thinkers than on their relationships with one another. Their disparate philosophical worlds, Brague shows, were grounded in different models of revelation that engendered divergent interpretations of the ancient Greek sources they held in common. So, despite striking similarities in their solutions for the philosophical problems they all faced, intellectuals in each theological tradition often viewed the others ideas with skepticism, if not disdain.

The Middle Ages

Johannes Fried gives us a Middle Ages full of people encountering the unfamiliar, grappling with new ideas, redefining power, and interacting with different societies—an era characterized by continuities and discontinuities, the vibrant ...

Author : Johannes Fried

Release : 2015-01-13

Publisher : Harvard University Press

ISBN : 0674055624

File Size : 41.32 MB

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Johannes Fried gives us a Middle Ages full of people encountering the unfamiliar, grappling with new ideas, redefining power, and interacting with different societies—an era characterized by continuities and discontinuities, the vibrant expansion of knowledge, and an understanding of the growing complexity of the world.

The Genesis of Science

The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific ...

Author : James Hannam

Release : 2011-03-22

Publisher : Simon and Schuster

ISBN : 1596982055

File Size : 42.95 MB

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The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science. Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.

Theology and the Scientific Imagination from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century

"(This work) promises to raise the level and transform the nature of discourse on the relations of Christianity and science . . . (Funkenstein) leaps fearlessly from one philosophical mountaintop to another, comparing and contrasting ...

Author : Amos Funkenstein

Release : 1986

Publisher : Princeton University Press

ISBN : 9780691024257

File Size : 60.36 MB

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"(This work) promises to raise the level and transform the nature of discourse on the relations of Christianity and science . . . (Funkenstein) leaps fearlessly from one philosophical mountaintop to another, comparing and contrasting doctrines in an amazing display of intellectual dexterity. The result is a bold study of ideas . . . bristling with insight and perceptive reinterpretation of familiar episodes in the history of natural philosophy".--David C. Lindberg, "Journal of the History of Medicine". *Lightning Print On Demand Title

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics

Davidson, Herbert, Proofs for eternity, creation and the existence of God in
medieval Islamic and Jewish philosophy, Oxford University Press, 1987. ... Grant,
Edward, God and reason in the Middle Ages, Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Author : Eleanor Robson

Release : 2008-12-18

Publisher : OUP Oxford

ISBN : 0191607444

File Size : 74.90 MB

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This Handbook explores the history of mathematics under a series of themes which raise new questions about what mathematics has been and what it has meant to practise it. It addresses questions of who creates mathematics, who uses it, and how. A broader understanding of mathematical practitioners naturally leads to a new appreciation of what counts as a historical source. Material and oral evidence is drawn upon as well as an unusual array of textual sources. Further, the ways in which people have chosen to express themselves are as historically meaningful as the contents of the mathematics they have produced. Mathematics is not a fixed and unchanging entity. New questions, contexts, and applications all influence what counts as productive ways of thinking. Because the history of mathematics should interact constructively with other ways of studying the past, the contributors to this book come from a diverse range of intellectual backgrounds in anthropology, archaeology, art history, philosophy, and literature, as well as history of mathematics more traditionally understood. The thirty-six self-contained, multifaceted chapters, each written by a specialist, are arranged under three main headings: 'Geographies and Cultures', 'Peoples and Practices', and 'Interactions and Interpretations'. Together they deal with the mathematics of 5000 years, but without privileging the past three centuries, and an impressive range of periods and places with many points of cross-reference between chapters. The key mathematical cultures of North America, Europe, the Middle East, India, and China are all represented here as well as areas which are not often treated in mainstream history of mathematics, such as Russia, the Balkans, Vietnam, and South America. A vital reference for graduates and researchers in mathematics, historians of science, and general historians.

Incarnational Humanism

medIeVal HumanIsm The essential contribution ofmedieval humanism to
Western culture was its elaboration of the church fathers' ... 5Edward Grant, God
and Reason in the Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001),
p. 356 ...

Author : Jens Zimmermann

Release : 2012-08-05

Publisher : InterVarsity Press

ISBN : 083086671X

File Size : 24.80 MB

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Having left its Christian roots behind, the West faces a moral, spiritual and intellectual crisis. It has little left to maintain its legacy of reason, freedom, human dignity and democracy. Far from capitulating, Jens Zimmermann believes the church has an opportunity to speak a surprising word into this postmodern situation grounded in the Incarnation itself that is proclaimed in Christian preaching and eucharistic celebration. To do so requires that we retrieve an ancient Christian humanism for our time. Only this will acknowledge and answer the general demand for a common humanity beyond religious, denominational and secular divides. Incarnational Humanism thus points the way forward by pointing backward. Rather than resorting to theological novelty, Zimmermann draws on the rich resources found in Scripture and in its theological interpreters ranging from Irenaeus and Augustine to de Lubac and Bonhoeffer. Zimmermann masterfully draws his comprehensive study together by proposing a distinctly evangelical philosophy of culture. That philosophy grasps the link between the new humanity inaugurated by Christ and all of humanity. In this way he holds up a picture of the public ministry of the church as a witness to the world's reconciliation to God.

Heaven and Earth in the Middle Ages

A discussion of European understanding of the physical world from the 9th century to the 15th, ranging from astronomy to zoology -- and refuting the more recent notion that the world was thought flat.

Author : Rudolf Simek

Release : 1996

Publisher : Boydell & Brewer

ISBN : 9780851156088

File Size : 54.35 MB

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A discussion of European understanding of the physical world from the 9th century to the 15th, ranging from astronomy to zoology -- and refuting the more recent notion that the world was thought flat.

Readings in Western Religious Thought: The Middle Ages through the Reformation

16): All Scripture inspired of God is profitable to teach, to reprove, to correct, to
instruct in justice. Now Scripture, inspired of God, is no part of philosophical
science, which has been built up by human reason. Therefore it is useful that
besides ...

Author : Patrick V. Reid

Release : 1987

Publisher : Paulist Press

ISBN : 9780809135332

File Size : 83.38 MB

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Using primary texts, this volume tells the story of Western religious heritage by tracing the three great Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) from the fall of Rome through the Christian Reformation of the sixteenth century.

The Problem of Sovereignty in the Later Middle Ages

all good things had been created by God , reason itself was ultimately divine , so
that by following reason man was still ultimately following the will of God rather
than his own desires . In this sense , said Aquinas , he is co - operating with God
 ...

Author : Michael Wilks

Release :

Publisher : CUP Archive

ISBN :

File Size : 38.74 MB

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An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy

... and reason in the Middle Ages, including scientia (“science,” “demonstrative
knowledge”) and sapientia (“wisdom”) as ... Given the vast amount of thinking
about God that occurred within medieval philosophy, it seemed only right to
devote ...

Author : Joseph W. Koterski

Release : 2011-09-09

Publisher : John Wiley & Sons

ISBN : 1444360671

File Size : 86.88 MB

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By exploring the philosophical character of some of the greatest medieval thinkers, An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy provides a rich overview of philosophy in the world of Latin Christianity. Explores the deeply philosophical character of such medieval thinkers as Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham Reviews the central features of the epistemological and metaphysical problem of universals Shows how medieval authors adapted philosophical ideas from antiquity to apply to their religious commitments Takes a broad philosophical approach of the medieval era by,taking account of classical metaphysics, general culture, and religious themes

Comparative Religious Ethics

version, it is in the modern age that human beings finally learn to live by reason
rather than childish myths. ... Thus for the neo-Platonist Augustine, who set the
agenda for the early Middle Ages, God who is eternal and above the created
world ...

Author : Darrell J. Fasching

Release : 2011-03-31

Publisher : John Wiley & Sons

ISBN : 9781444396126

File Size : 32.40 MB

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This popular textbook has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect recent global developments, whilst retaining its unique and compelling narrative-style approach. Using ancient stories from diverse religions, it explores a broad range of important and complex moral issues, resulting in a truly reader-friendly and comparative introduction to religious ethics. A thoroughly revised and expanded new edition of this popular textbook, yet retains the unique narrative-style approach which has proved so successful with students Considers the ways in which ancient stories from diverse religions, such as the Bhagavad Gita and the lives of Jesus and Buddha, have provided ethical orientation in the modern world Updated to reflect recent discussions on globalization and its influence on cross-cultural and comparative ethics, economic dimensions to ethics, Gandhian traditions, and global ethics in an age of terrorism Expands coverage of Asian religions, quest narratives, the religious and philosophical approach to ethics in the West, and considers Chinese influences on Thich Nhat Hanh’s Zen Buddhism, and Augustine’s Confessions Accompanied by an instructor’s manual (coming soon, see www.wiley.com/go/fasching) which shows how to use the book in conjunction with contemporary films