Jung the Mystic

The Esoteric Dimensions of Carl Jung's Life and Teachings

Jung the Mystic

This bold, compact new biography of Carl Jung fills a gap in our understanding of the pioneering psychiatrist by focusing on the occult and mystical dimension of Jung's life and work, a critical but frequently misunderstood facet of his career. Although he is often called the "founding father of the New Age," Carl Jung, the legendary Swiss psychiatrist best known for his groundbreaking concepts like the collective unconscious, archetype theory, and synchronicity, often took pains to avoid any explicit association with mysticism or the occult. Yet Jung lived a life rich in paranormal experiences-arguing for the existence of poltergeists in a debate with Sigmund Freud, participating in séances, incorporating astrology into his therapeutic work, reporting a near death experience, and collaborating with the pioneering ESP researcher J. B. Rhine. It is these critical experiences-often fleetingly touched on in other biographies or critical studies, and just as frequently used to make a case against Jung and his philosophies-that form the core of this exciting new biography, Jung the Mystic. While Jung's ghostwritten memoirs, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, touch on the role his mystical and occult experiences played in his life, Gary Lachman's Jung the Mystic completes the circle: Lachman assesses Jung's life and work from the viewpoint of Western esoteric tradition and helpfully places Jung in the context of other major esoteric thinkers, such as Rudolf Steiner, G. I. Gurdjieff, and Emanuel Swedenborg. In that respect, this new biography appeals directly to the sensibility of spiritual readers who rightly see Jung as a pioneer of today's contemporary metaphysical culture.

Was C.G. Jung a Mystic?

And Other Essays

Was C.G. Jung a Mystic?

Aniela Jaffe discusses Jung's openness to considering the reality of reincarnation, life after death, and his willingness to communicate his dreams and fantasies on the subject.

Mythos and Logos in the Thought of Carl Jung

The Theory of the Collective Unconscious in Scientific Perspective

Mythos and Logos in the Thought of Carl Jung

The author explores and defends the bold thesis that the idea of the collective unconscious can be reconciled with a scientific world outlook as he sketches a big picture from Jung’s psychological viewpoint. In his examination of Jung’s archetypes, Shelburne considers the chief critical views of the scientific import of Jung’s thesis as he discusses the issue of rationality posed by the theory. There is also a discussion of how the ideas of James Hillman contrast with those of Jung on the issue of the scientific nature of archetypes. Shelburne presents scientific evidence for the existence of archetypes and shows how the theory fits in with modern evolutionary biology.

The Dionysian Self

C.G. Jung's Reception of Friedrich Nietzsche

The Dionysian Self

In der Reihe werden herausragende monographische Interpretationen von Nietzsches Werk im Ganzen oder von spezifischen Themen und Aspekten aus unterschiedlichen wissenschaftlichen Perspektiven veröffentlicht, vor allem aus philosophischer, literatur- und kommunikationswissenschaftlicher, soziologischer und historischer Sicht. Die Publikationen repräsentieren den aktuellen Stand. Jeder Band ist peer-reviewed.

Conscience and Jung's Moral Vision

From Id to Thou

Conscience and Jung's Moral Vision

David Robinson's new book is unique in that it provides an extended critical exposition of Jung's moral psychology and a comparative analysis of his theory of conscience in particular. The author corrects this absence by providing a fresh and original reading of Jung. In contrast to simplistic stereotypes, he demonstrates that moral struggle-with all of its relational, behavioral, and spiritual implications-is at the heart of his psychology. The concept of conscience serves as the locus of this apologetic for his contemporary significance. Further, this book offers a positive theory for identifying and describing the primary sources of contemporary moral nihilism, namely, reductive naturalism (scientism) and epistologicl relativism (perspectivalism). The logic and root assumptions of these theoretical viewpoints are then engaged and qualified-if not refuted-through an extended, comparative discussion of the theories of Freud and Nietzsche with those of Jung.

The Astrological Neptune and the Quest for Redemption

The Astrological Neptune and the Quest for Redemption

The longing for redemption is a many-headed daimon that dwells within the most earthbound and prosaic of souls. Neptune is the astrological symbol that describes this energy. Liz Greene, an internationally known astrologer, has given us the most complete and accessible book about Neptune ever written! She explores Neptune themes in literature, myth, politics, religion, fashion, and art to show how this energy manifests.

The Power of the Bull

The Power of the Bull

Everyone has heard of the Minotaur in the labyrinth on Crete and many know that the Greek gods would adopt the guise of a bull to seduce mortal women. But what lies behind these legends? The Power of the Bull discusses mankind's enduring obsession with bulls. The bull is an almost universal symbol throughout Indo-European cultures. Bull cults proliferated in the Middle East and in many parts of North Africa, and one cult, Mithraism, was the greatest rival to Christianity in the Roman Empire. The Cults are divergent yet have certain core elements in common. Michael Rice argues that the ancient bulls were the supreme sacrificial animal. An examination of evidence from earliest prehistory onwards reveals the bull to be a symbol of political authority, sexual potency, economic wealth and vast subterranean powers. In some areas representations of the bull have varied little from earliest times, in others it has changed vastly over centuries. This volume provides a well-illustrated and accessible analysis of the exceptionally rich artistic inheritance associated with the bull.

Jung and his Mystics

In the end it all comes to nothing

Jung and his Mystics

Jung’s psychology describes the origin of the Gods and their religions in terms of the impact of archetypal powers on consciousness. For Jung this impact is the basis of the numinous, the experience of the divine in nature and in human nature. His psychology, while possessed of a certain claim to science, is based on depths of subjective experience which transcends psychology and science as ordinarily understood. Jung and his Mystics: In the end it all comes to nothing examines the mythic nature of Jung’s psychology and thought, and demonstrates the influence of mysticism and certain religious thinkers in formulating his own work. John P. Dourley explores the influence of Mechthild of Magdeburg and fellow mystics/Beguines, and traces the mystic impulse and its expression through Meister Eckhat and Jacob Boehme to Hegel in the nineteenth century. All of these mystics were of the apophatic school and understood the culmination of their experience to lie in an identity with divinity in a nothingness beyond all form, formal expression or immediate activity. Dourley shows how this is still of relevance in our lives today. The book concludes that Jung’s understanding of mysticism could greatly alleviate the conflict between faiths, religious or political, by drawing attention to their common origin in the depths of the human. Jung and his Mystics: In the end it all comes to nothing is aimed at scholars and senior research students in Jungian Studies, including religionists, theologians and philosophers of religion, especially those with an interest in mysticism. It will also be essential reading for those interested in the connection between religious and psychological experience.

The intersubjectivity of the mystic

a study of Teresa of Avila's Interior castle

The intersubjectivity of the mystic

In the popular mind, the mystic is seen as the supreme solitary. This image, if accurate, would make the mystical quest marginal in an era when much theology has emphasized socially responsible praxis. Against the popular image, Mary Frohlich develops a theological model -- based on the writings of Bernard Lonergan and the "self-psychology" of Heinz Kohut -- that both respects mysticism's irreducible character and shows how it concretely transforms people and systems. She then applies this model to an interpretation of a classic expression of spiritual transformation, the Interior Castle of the sixteenth-century mystic Teresa of Avila.

The Remaking of Sigmund Freud

The Remaking of Sigmund Freud

O Brave New World . . . When man roamed freely among the planets and away to the stars, spacecraft had to carry the best advisers with them, for outside help was usually too far off to do any good in emergencies. And so the android simulacrum was born - a conveniently storable but believably human package which duplicated all the strengths of the Master after whom each was modeled. For centuries a Sigmund Freud was standard equipment on long voyages, but put to little use. Then Man met his first etees, and Freud's career entered a new phase - one which would change history forever.