Old Style Lenormand

Old Style Lenormand

Old Style Lenormand brings charming, vintage-looking illustrations to a modern Lenormand audience. The simple and concise imagery provides highly specific answers to your questions. Playing card insets increase the divination power of the cards. Old Style Lenormand is comprised of 38 cards (including two Man and two Lady cards). A 92-page illustrated booklet accompanies the deck. Alexander Ray is a popular Russian psychologist, writer and illustrator who creates divinatory tools that help people find their place in life.

Learning Lenormand

Traditional Fortune Telling for Modern Life

Learning Lenormand

Uses simple instructions to teach beginners how to read fortunes with the Lenormand card deck.

Tarot Lenormand / Tarot De Madame Lenormand

Tarot Lenormand / Tarot De Madame Lenormand

Discover an Ancient Tarot with a Modern Twist The most common tradition of Tarot today only goes back 100 years. The Tarot, however, is much older. Now you can use the type of cards that influenced the modern system, bringing a true level of authenticity and history to all of your readings. The Tarot Lenormand combines the famous Lenormand oracle deck with Etteilla's Thoth Tarot, a bit of the modern tradition and puts it all together with a twist of modern wit and cleverness, and a dollop of original design. How can it do all this? By being inspired by all of these deck rather than just copying them. The result is something very unique and original, but also familiar enough for use by most Tarot readers. The difference is that these updated ancient designs will give your readings a feeling of true antiquity and a power not found in other Tarot decks. Although it is based on a combination of symbols and styles, it features beautiful, clean, and uncluttered art that truly represents its Napoleonic setting. If feels unified, comprehensive, fresh and new. This feeling will carry into your readings and meditations, bringing new interpretations, concepts, and depth. This isn't just a copy of other decks, it's something that is familiar while being unlike any other Tarot deck. And that's the key to this deck. It's both very old in style and yet as modern as tomorrow. Perfect for people of any spiritual system, this intriguing deck is a must for all Tarot practitioners and collectors.

Treatise on Style

Treatise on Style

Surprising juxtapositions like goats spread across pianos and fearful optical illusions like eyeballs being sliced characterized the surrealistic movement in the arts in 1928 when Louis Aragon published Traité du Style in Paris. Aragon had become ever more contemptuous of vogues and pretensions. In the name of surrealism, he produced the first significant critique of it. Instead of merely upsetting old relationships and skewering sensibilities, Traité du Style was meant to shock with a capital S, and it did. Only now has it been completely translated into English. Although time has attenuated the scandalous nature of Aragon's language, his criticism has lost none of its edge in this translation by Alyson Waters. From the beginning, which describes a postcard showing a little boy on a potty as representative of French humor and the French spirit, to the end, an attack in scatalogical language on the French military establishment, Aragon zeros in on one target after another. Nothing escapes his notice or venom—whether it is the masturbatory output of contemporary writers, the prostitution of culture, or the perversions of government. Still, Treatise on Style is more than a brilliant diatribe directed against what Aragon perceived as the moral, political, and intellectual failures of his time. He proposes surrealism, in art as in life, as a means to achieve a valid ethical and aesthetic "style." Surrealism, as Aragon defines it here, loses some of its mythical and mystical trappings; it becomes inspiration with rolled-up shirt-sleeves. He exercises this faculty in his own writing, which aims to shake readers out of their complacency by alternating the intensely lyrical with the borderline obscene and juxtaposing the language of the educated elite with that of the street. Whether denouncing religious fantacism or dispensing praise, Aragon remains true to his idea of the surrealist project: to reclassify certain values through the act of writing itself. Treatise on Style entertains as a portrait of a movement and of a personality who kept moving.

French Cello Sonatas, 1871-1939

French Cello Sonatas, 1871-1939

"Sensbach presents the historical background of each piece and provides biographies of the composers. There are also biographies of cellists and pianists of the period, many of whom were well known at the time but have since faded into undeserved obscurity. Technical information - including a listing of keys and time signatures, an example of the opening measures, dates of publication and library locations - is provided for each sonata. A brief description is made of each movement, covering form, style and level of difficulty for the performers. Where possible, excerpts of original reviews and comments from the composers' letters have been included. The book is richly illustrated with contemporary photographs and drawings, many published here for the first time."--BOOK JACKET.

Uptown Conversation

The New Jazz Studies

Uptown Conversation

'Uptown Conversation' asserts that jazz is not only a music to define, it is a culture. The essays illustrate how for more than a century jazz has initiated a call and response across art forms, geographies, and cultures, inspiring musicians, filmmakers, painters and poets.