Out of Australia

Aborigines, the Dreamtime, and the Dawn of the Human Race

Out of Australia

In their startling new book, Steven and Evan Strong challenge the "out-of-Africa" theory. Based on fresh examination of both the DNA and archeological evidence, they conclude that modern humans originated from Australia, not Africa. The original Australians (referred to by some as Aborigines ), like so many indigenous peoples, are portrayed as "backward" and "primitive." Yet, as the Strongs demonstrate, original Australians had a rich culture, which may have sown the first seeds of spirituality in the world. They had the technology to make international seafaring voyages and have left traces in the Americas and possibly Japan, Southern India, Egypt, and elsewhere. They practiced brain surgery, invented the first hand tools, and had knowledge of penicillin. This book brings together 30 years of intensive research in consultation with elders in the original Australian community. Among their conclusions are the following: There is evidence that humans existed in Australia 40,000 years before they existed in Australia. There were migrations of original Australians in large boats throughout the Indian/Pacific rim. Three distinct kinds of Homo sapiens are found in Australia. There is evidence from the Americas that debunks the out-of-Africa theory. The spiritual influence of the Aborigines is reflected in the religions of the world.

Out of Australia

Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas

Out of Australia

This ground-breaking book follows the rise of a distinctive school of Australian art that first emerged in the 1940s. Beginning with the artists of the Angry Penguins movement, Arthur Boyd, Albert Tucker, Joy Hester and Sidney Nolan, whose work exhibited a new strain of surrealism and expressionism, the book continues with the rich variety of 1970s work by Jan Seberg, Robert Jacks and George Baldessin, moving through to contemporary artists such as Rover Thomas and Judy Watson. Stephen Coppel traces the major developments in Australian art from the 1940s to the present day, and examines the significant interplay with the British art scene. The book will include a substantial essay outlining the major developments in Australian art since the 1940s, the reception of Australian art in Britain and the recent rise of Aboriginal printmaking. It will feature 127 works by 61 artists, and include concise artists biographies and individual commentaries on the works.

Out of Australia

Out of Australia

David. J. Delaney's poetry epitomises the 'fair dinkumness' of Australia and its people. His work is genuine and appealing with dimensions of bush ballads, military themes, love and family. Dave's journey as a poet in this anthology shows his dedication to refine his craft as a writer. He is emerging as a 'true blue' popular verse-maker. Hazel Menehira FTCL. ANZDA. RTSCA (internationally recognised poet)

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

The Out of Australia Theory

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

This book brings together science, history and Australian Original archaeology of the highest pedigree that substantiates our belief that ancient advanced technology, earlier civilisations and a possible Ancient Alien involvement was part of the ancient landscape of Australia. Includes 78 diagrams and photographs.

The American Occupation of Australia, 1941-45

A Marriage of Necessity

The American Occupation of Australia, 1941-45

Over 120,000 American troops were stationed in Australia during the Second World War. Hundreds of thousands more passed through the country between 1941 and 1945. Because of Japan’s conquest of the Philippines in 1942, Australia was transformed into the principle base for the United States Army in the Southwest Pacific. This American occupation of an allied country resulted in several areas of tension between friends. The examination of these “fault lines,” which have, for the most part, received little attention from historians, is the purpose of this book. Jurisdictional and policing disputes and problems between Australian workers and American authorities are examined. American personnel committed thousands of crimes during the occupation, many of which were notorious. How Australians reacted to these crimes and how the American military sought to limit their negative effect on wartime relations is a major focus of this book. How the US military tried to protect GIs from prosecution by spiriting them out of Australia is also explored. Other areas of tension such as race and gender relations, which have been looked at by other historians, are examined in a new light; this book provides novel insights and challenges the existing historiography with regard to relations between black Americans and Australian civilians. How leaders on both sides, in particular Douglas MacArthur and John Curtin, managed crises and relations between civilians and GIs are studied. Sexual relations, an area of particular concern for authorities, were directed towards short-term flings and prostitution. In contrast, authorities did all they could to discourage long-term relations (i.e., marriage). Authorities obsessed over interracial sexual relations and doubled efforts to discourage them. Conflicts between American personnel and Australian civilians during the occupation did not threaten the alliance against Japan. Nevertheless, there were myriad problems between allies that led to friction and ill-will. These problems demanded management from above.