Real Role Models

Successful African Americans Beyond Pop Culture

Real Role Models

All young people need good role models, and black youth especially need positive and real examples beyond the famous and wealthy people they see on SportsCenter highlights and MTV Cribs. While success as a celebrity athlete or entertainer may seem like an achievable dream, the reality is that young African Americans have a much greater chance of succeeding in the professions through education and hard work—and a mentor to show them the path. Real Role Models introduces high school and college-age African Americans to twenty-three black professionals who have achieved a high level of success in their chosen fields and who tell their stories to inspire young people to pursue a professional career and do the work necessary to achieve their dreams. Some of the individuals profiled by Joah Spearman and Louis Harrison, Jr., include Leonard Pitts, Pulitzer Prize–winning columnist for the Miami Herald; Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council; Danyel Smith, editor-in-chief of Vibe; and Dr. Tim George, Chief of Pediatric Neuroscience at Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas. They and other interviewees describe their backgrounds, career paths, and desire to give back by helping others reach their goals. Representing a wide range of occupations, these real role models prove to African American youths that a whole world of successful, rewarding careers awaits them. The Real Role Models Rufus Cormier, JD, Partner at the Baker Botts Law Firm, Houston, Texas Melody Barnes, Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, Washington, D.C. Eric Motley, PhD, Managing Director of the Aspen Institute's Henry Crown Fellowship Program, Aspen, Colorado James McIntyre, Spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, D.C. Tracie Hall, Assistant Dean and Librarian at Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois Kimberlydawn Wisdom, MD, Surgeon General of the State of Michigan, Lansing, Michigan Timothy George, MD, Chief of Pediatric Neuroscience at Dell Children's Medical Center, Austin, Texas Victoria Holloway Barbosa, MD, Ethnic Dermatologist and Former Executive for L'Oreal, Chicago, Illinois Bill Douglas, White House Correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers, Washington, D.C. Leonard Pitts, Jr., Columnist for the Miami Herald, Miami, Florida Danyel Smith, Editor of Vibe Magazine, New York, New York Ed Stewart, Managing Director of External Communications for Delta Airlines, Atlanta, Georgia Lynn Tyson, Vice President of Investor Relations for Dell, Austin, Texas Willie Miles, Jr., Founder and CEO of Miles Wealth Management, Houston, Texas Horace Allen, Founder and CEO of TeamPact, Atlanta, Georgia Deavra Daughtry, President and CEO of Excellent Care Management, Houston, Texas Je'Caryous Johnson, Founder and CEO of I'm Ready Productions, Houston, Texas Steve Jones, Cofounder of a graphic design company, Oakland, California Isiah Warner, PhD, Chemistry Professor at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Gloria Ladson-Billings, PhD, Professor of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin Bernard Muir, Athletic Director at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. Craig Littlepage, Athletic Director at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia Beverly Kearney, Women's Track Coach at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

Playing for Real

Hindu Role Models, Religion, and Gender

Playing for Real

This Book Investigates The Ways In Which Influential Figures And Types, Mythological And Contemporary, Have Functioned And Continue To Function As Role Models In Matters Of Gender, Authority, And Power In A Variety Of Hindu Contexts.

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Are Athletes Good Role Models?

Do marketers need to adopt a stricter moral clause to police athlete behavior? To what degree do sports scandals reflect culture at large? How can athletes lead in combating homophobia? The informative edition tackles these questions and debates surrounding athletes as role models. Readers are offered a diverse set of perspectives on the topic through a variety of essays and articles.

Absent Aviators

Gender Issues in Aviation

Absent Aviators

The objective of this book is to present a number of related chapters on the subject of gender issues in the workplace of the aviation industry. More specifically, the chapters address the continuing shortfall in the number of women pilots in both civilian and military aviation. Considerable research has been carried out on gender issues in the workplace and, for example, women represent about 10% of employees in engineering. This example is often used to show that the consequences of gender discrimination are embedded and difficult to overcome in masculine-dominated occupations. However, women represent only 5-6% of the profession of pilot. Clearly there are many factors which mitigate women seeking to become pilots. The chapters within this volume raise both theoretical and practical issues, endeavouring to address the imbalance of women pilots in this occupation. Absent Aviators consolidates a diverse range of issues from a number of authors from Australia, Austria, the United States, Canada, South Africa and the United Kingdom. Each of the chapters is research-based and aims to present a broad picture of gender issues in aviation, gendered workplaces and sociology, underpinned by sound theoretical perspectives and methodologies. One chapter additionally raises issues on the historical exclusion of race from an airline. The book will prove to be a valuable contribution to the debates on women in masculine-oriented occupations and a practical guide for the aviation industry to help overcome the looming shortfall of pilots. It is also hoped it will directly encourage young women to identify and overcome the barriers to becoming a civilian or military pilot.

When Public Housing was Paradise

Building Community in Chicago

When Public Housing was Paradise

Uses oral histories to show the enormous benefit to low-income working people of public housing between 1938 and 1960.

Emotional Intelligence

People Smart Role Models

Emotional Intelligence

This book illustrates the importance of people skills in achieving success using role models from history. Being smart, having a high IQ, is certainly important in succeeding, but emotional quotient (EQ) the measure of emotional intelligence, is a more important factor. We can work to improve our EQ, but our IQ is relatively fixed.

Nevermind

The Last Temptation of Frank

Nevermind

Frank Teeman is leading a happy anonymous life in Manhattan painting the unusual images that get stuck in his mind. One day a wealthy doyenne spots a painting that hangs in the grocery store where he works and Frank's career takes off and his life is never the same. "Security is mostly superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing. To keep our faces toward change and behave like free spirits in the presence of fate is strength undefeatable." Helen Keller-Let Us Have Faith

Light Shining in a Dark Place

Discovering Theology through Film

Light Shining in a Dark Place

In Light Shining in a Dark Place, Jeff Sellars has drawn together more than a dozen scholars around the theme of discovering theology through the moving medium of film. The varied contributors in this collection explore, through their particular lenses, how theological ideas might be seen in and considered through one of the most popular of modern art forms. From subjects of sin, grace, and forgiveness to violence, science fiction/fantasy, and zombies, Light Shining in a Dark Place assists the theologically interested film viewer in tracing the light that might be found in the filmic arts back to the source of all lights. Contributors include: Bruce L. Edwards, J. Sage Elwell, Michael Leary, Peter Malone, Kevin C. Neece, Simon Oliver, Kim Paffenroth, J. Ryan Parker, Travis Prinzi, Megan J. Robinson, Scott Shiffer, James H. Thrall, and Alissa Wilkinson

For the Record

The First Women in Canadian Architecture

For the Record

When Marjorie Hill graduated in 1920 as Canada’s "first girl architect," she was entering a profession that had been established in Canada just 30 years earlier. For the Record, the first history of women architects in Canada, provides a fascinating introduction to early women architects, presented within the context of developments in both Europe and North America. Profiles of the women who graduated from the School of Architecture at the University of Toronto between 1920 and 1960 are illustrated with photographs of their work and include archival material that has never before been published. The final chapter on contemporary women in architecture showcases contributions by leading women architects across the country, from Halifax to Vancouver to Iqaluit. For the Record also provides current information on schools of architecture in Canada and includes a list of other resources to encourage young women who are thinking of pursuing careers in architecture.