The End of Sorrow

The Bhagavad Gita for Daily Living, Vol I

The End of Sorrow

"This volume originally appeared in a hardcover edition ... under the title The Bhagavad Gita for daily living, chapters 1 through 6, published by the Blue Mountain Center of Meditation."--T.p. verso.

The End of Sorrow

A Novel of the Siege of Leningrad in WWII

The End of Sorrow

All New Edition! This second edition includes a new cover, a cast of characters, an enhanced layout, substantial editing, and 40,000 fewer words. A love that would not die . . . A city that would not surrender . . . A war that knew no bounds . . . The date is June 21st, 1941, and Adolf Hitler is about to lead Germany into what would become one of the bloodiest, most barbaric wars the world would ever know. His invasion plan, Operation: Barbarossa, calls for taking the northern Russian city of Leningrad in a matter of weeks, but as the troops reach the outside border of the city, the Soviet resistance stiffens and a stalemate ensues. Hitler calls for continual bombardment of the city and cutting off all outside supplies. He boasts that the city will starve to death and the German forces will march into a ghost town. Follow a cast of lovers, heroes, and fiends some real-to-life as they struggle through one of the most horrific human dramas ever created. For 900 days, the citizens and soldiers of Leningrad, Russia endured one of the worst sieges in the history of mankind. Some would find the inner strength to light the way. Others would descend into madness. Read their stories, and explore for yourself just what is the end of sorrow. "The Classical Russian form lives on: This novel is no pale imitation. … The End of Sorrow is a triumph of craft. A rock-solid, gratifying choice for discerning fans of serious literature." – ForeWord Clarion Five Star Review

The Harvest of Sorrow

Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-famine

The Harvest of Sorrow

A reconstruction of the causes, circumstances, and consequences of Stalin's forced collectivization of Soviet agriculture details the fate of villages and individuals

Cry of Sorrow

Cry of Sorrow

The Coranians have won the war, and Kymru is defeated. For Havgan, however, the victory is not complete. Cadair Idris, the hall of the High Kings, remains closed to him. To gain entrance, he must locate the Four Treasures?the Stone, the Spear, the Cauldron, and the Sword?and bring them to the Guardian of the Doors. Only then can he proclaim himself High King of Kymru. But the Treasures were hidden long ago. In order to save Kymru, Gwydion the Dreamer must locate a long-forgotten song and the clues it contains before Havgan does. Following the dictates of the song, he persuades Rhiannon, her daughter Gwenhwyvar, and his nephew Arthur to set out with him on the dangerous quest. Dogged by Havgan's soldiers, they must hurry to find the artifacts. Soon, distrust and fear complicate their already difficult journey, and one of them must risk life and limb on the next move in their deadly game.

Refiguring the Map of Sorrow

Nature Writing and Autobiography

Refiguring the Map of Sorrow

This study brings together the genres of autobiography and environmental literature. It examines a form of grief narrative in which writers deal with mourning by standing outside the text in writing about the natural world, and inside it in making that exposition part of the grieving process.

The End of Satisfaction

Drama and Repentance in the Age of Shakespeare

The End of Satisfaction

In The End of Satisfaction, Heather Hirschfeld recovers the historical specificity and the conceptual vigor of the term "satisfaction" during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Focusing on the term’s significance as an organizing principle of Christian repentance, she examines the ways in which Shakespeare and his contemporaries dramatized the consequences of its re- or de-valuation in the process of Reformation doctrinal change. The Protestant theology of repentance, Hirschfeld suggests, underwrote a variety of theatrical plots "to set things right" in a world shorn of the prospect of "making enough" (satisfacere). Hirschfeld’s semantic history traces today’s use of "satisfaction"—as an unexamined measure of inward gratification rather than a finely nuanced standard of relational exchange—to the pressures on legal, economic, and marital discourses wrought by the Protestant rejection of the Catholic sacrament of penance (contrition, confession, satisfaction) and represented imaginatively on the stage. In so doing, it offers fresh readings of the penitential economies of canonical plays including Dr. Faustus, The Revenger’s Tragedy, The Merchant of Venice, and Othello; considers the doctrinal and generic importance of lesser-known plays including Enough Is as Good as a Feast and Love’s Pilgrimage; and opens new avenues into the study of literature and repentance in early modern England.

Love in a World of Sorrow

A Teenage Girl's Holocaust Memoirs

Love in a World of Sorrow

Sereena is a green bird who tries to live in a tree where only red birds are allowed to live. She covers herself with red sand in order to be accepted. But when she has a green baby she realizes she has to be herself, and convinces the other birds that living with all types and colors of birds is the best thing to do. Written in English, the book contains the original Yiddish language text, a Yiddish-English dictionary for children, and some basic Yiddish lessons. An ideal, multi-cultural book that helps children understand how prejudice detracts from the beauty of our world.