The Wild Woman's Way

Unlock Your Full Potential for Pleasure, Power, and Fulfillment

The Wild Woman's Way

Discover how to create and enjoy a pleasure-filled and meaningful life with this practical tantra handbook for the high-achieving modern woman. For women today, achieving a successful career, a fulfilling romantic relationship, and a rewarding personal life can feel like opposing goals, leaving their deepest yearnings just beyond reach. It has even become difficult to enjoy the simplest pleasures of our lives. We are stuck in “go-mode,” damaging our romantic relationships, pleasure, and creativity. But what if there were a way to experience the simplest pleasures of our lives on a deeper level, freeing the body and psyche from these damaging patterns? Beyond our current stereotypes about femininity lies the ancient wisdom of the Wild Woman archetype, a model of building a feminine “body intelligence.” By embodying this archetype and using tantra—not just in the bedroom, but also to build intimate connections to our senses and physical movements, bringing bliss to smaller or more mundane activities like taking a sip of tea or walking down the street—we can break harmful psychological patterns. In The Wild Woman’s Way, Michaela Boehm shares practical rituals and exercises drawn from years of experience as a celebrity relationship and life counselor and an expert in tantric yoga. She reveals the power of different types of touch, while also training you in forms of meditation and stretching that increase activity and sensual pleasure. Soon, you will learn to switch effortlessly between the aggressive “go-mode” required to compete successfully at work, and the feminine “flow-mode” of softness and receptivity. By harnessing the duality of the Wild Woman, you will attract and inspire meaningful relationships with romantic partners, your own body, and with life itself.

Wild Hearts (The Wild Women Series, Book 4)

Wild Hearts (The Wild Women Series, Book 4)

Priscilla Stillbottom, a respectable rancher’s daughter, dreamed of performing on the stage. But she never expected that fleeing an unwanted husband would make that dream come true. Or that she'd end up a star saloon singer in a rough-and-ready Colorado mining town. And she certainly never imagined Payton Cobb, the devilishly handsome saloon owner, whom she must outwit to hide not only her past, but a newly sparked hunger too. Payton Cobb knows most folks who come to Central City are running from something, even the elusive "Miss Prissy", whose fiery innocence he can't seem to outrun—or resist! Originally titled: Tempting Miss Prissy REVIEWS: "...a real work of art... wonderful characters... vivid, entertaining scenes... a keeper for sure!" ~Gloria Miller, Literary Times THE WILD WOMEN, in series order: Untamed Wildcat Wild Rose Wild Hearts

Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador

Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador

In 1903 Hubbard's husband, Leonidas, starved to death on his cartographic and ethnographic expedition to Labrador. Hubbard decided to complete her husband's work, becoming a skilled explorer and cartographer in her own right. She set out in July 1905 and with the help of George Elson, a Métis guide who had been employed by her husband on the original trip, and three other guides completed her expedition in record time with significant results, including completing the first accurate map of the Labrador river system, thus correcting the earlier map that had led to her husband's death. Her original photographs and the map are reproduced in this volume.

Woman Who Mapped Labrador

The Life and Expedition Diary of Mina Hubbard

Woman Who Mapped Labrador

The definitive Hubbard, combining her previously unpublished diary, a full biography, and new maps that break down her daring canoe trip day by day.

Women with Visible and Invisible Disabilities

Multiple Intersections, Multiple Issues, Multiple Therapies

Women with Visible and Invisible Disabilities

This thoughtful collection addresses the issues faced by women with disabilities, examines the social construction of disability, and makes suggestions for the development and modification of culturally relevant therapy to meet the needs of disabled women. Written in an accessible style with a minimum of jargon, this book provides clinical material from the perspectives of psychotherapists, clients, personal assistants, and health administrators. Women with Visible and Invisible Disabilities also highlights the importance of considering age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation in its examination of feminist approaches to assessment, psychotherapy, disability management (coping), and discusses how the Americans with Disabilities Act impacts employment and education for women.

Shopping for Buddhas

An Adventure in Nepal

Shopping for Buddhas

Jeff Greenwald's classic travelogue follows his quest for the "perfect" Buddha statue. At turns hilarious and moving, his quest features a cast of amazing characters — from a passionate palmist to a flying lama — who provide unforgettable glimpses into the daily life and culture of the former kingdom (including a wild ride on Kathmandu’s very first escalator). Greenwald doesn't shy away from Shangri-la’s darker side. Along with colorful descriptions of Hindu and Buddhist mythology, the book tells of the rampant corruption, art smuggling, assassination attempts and human right abuses that would ignite Nepal’s violent "People Power" Revolution in April 1990. A new afterword by the author recounts Nepal's tumultuous recent history — including the massacre of the royal family — in vivid detail. And a new preface introduces this 25th anniversary edition with some thoughts about how Nepal, and travel writing, have evolved since the book’s first publication. Shopping for Buddhas remains a must-read for anyone who has visited, or plans to visit, Nepal.

Killing the Indian Maiden

Images of Native American Women in Film

Killing the Indian Maiden

Killing the Indian Maiden examines the fascinating and often disturbing portrayal of Native American women in film. Through discussion of thirty-four Hollywood films from the silent period to the present, M. Elise Marubbio examines the sacrificial role of what she terms the "Celluloid Maiden" -- a young Native woman who allies herself with a white male hero and dies as a result of that choice. Marubbio intertwines theories of colonization, gender, race, and film studies to ground her study in sociohistorical context all in an attempt to define what it means to be an American. As Marubbio charts the consistent depiction of the Celluloid Maiden, she uncovers two primary characterizations -- the Celluloid Princess and the Sexualized Maiden. The archetype for the exotic Celluloid Princess appears in silent films such as Cecil B. DeMille's The Squaw Man (1914) and is thoroughly established in American iconography in Delmer Daves's Broken Arrow (1950). Her more erotic sister, the Sexualized Maiden, emerges as a femme fatale in such films as DeMille's North West Mounted Police (1940), King Vidor's Duel in the Sun (1946), and Charles Warren's Arrowhead (1953). The two characterizations eventually combine to form a hybrid Celluloid Maiden who first appears in John Ford's The Searchers (1956) and reappears in the 1970s and the 1990s in such films as Arthur Penn's Little Big Man (1970) and Michael Apted's Thunderheart (1992). Killing the Indian Maiden reveals a cultural iconography about Native Americans and their role in the frontier embedded in the American psyche. The Native American woman is a racialized and sexualized other -- a conquerable body representing both the seductions and the dangers of the frontier. These films show her being colonized and suffering at the hands of Manifest Destiny and American expansionism, but Marubbio argues that the Native American woman also represents a threat to the idea of a white America. The complexity and longevity of the Celluloid Maiden icon -- persisting into the twenty-first century -- symbolizes an identity crisis about the composition of the American national body that has played over and over throughout different eras and political climates. Ultimately, Marubbio establishes that the ongoing representation of the Celluloid Maiden signals the continuing development and justification of American colonialism.

The Sword of Heaven

A Five Continent Odyssey to Save the World

The Sword of Heaven

“Any attempt at peace must be attended by a knowledge of self,” discovers writer and photographer Mikkel Aaland, who grew up with a bomb shelter for a bedroom, in terror of nuclear war. At the height of the Cold War, Aaland finds himself drawn into a mysterious Shinto priest’s plan to save the world. Traveling from Norway to the Philippines, Iceland to South Africa, he places pieces of a sacred Shinto sword in key power spots around the world. Along the way, he comes face to face with his deepest childhood fears of war and destruction, encounters the compelling and mysterious Shinto religion, struggles with the uncertainties of love, and learns to face life with an open heart. The Sword of Heaven tells the extraordinary true story of a journey in which all boundaries are pushed—geographical, cultural, and personal—and in which the healing of the world and the healing of one man appear to be inextricably linked.