Voices of the First Day

Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime

Voices of the First Day

Australian aboriginal people have lived in harmony with the earth for perhaps as long as 100,000 years; in their words, since the First Day. In this absorbing work, Lawlor explores the essence of their culture as a source of and guide to transforming our own world view. While not romanticizing the past or suggesting a return to the life of the hunter/gatherer, Voices of the First Day enables us to enter into the mentality of the oldest continuous culture on earth and gain insight into our own relationship with the earth and to each other. This book offers an opportunity to suspend our values, prejudices, and Eurocentrism and step into the Dreaming to discover: • A people who rejected agriculture, architecture, writing, clothing, and the subjugation of animals • A lifestyle of hunting and gathering that provided abundant food of unsurpassed nutritional value • Initiatic and ritual practices that hold the origins of all esoteric, yogic, magical, and shamanistic traditions • A sexual and emotional life that afforded diversity and fluidity as well as marital and social stability • A people who valued kinship, community, and the law of the Dreamtime as their greatest "possessions." • Language whose richness of structure and vocabulary reveals new worlds of perception and comprehension. • A people balanced between the Dreaming and the perceivable world, in harmony with all species and living each day as the First Day. Voices of the First Day is illustrated throughout with more than 100 extraordinary photographs, bark paintings, line drawings and engravings. Many of these photographs are among the earliest ever made of the Aboriginal people and are shown here for the first time.

Voices of the First World War

Voices of the First World War

This poignant cycle of poems by Jenny Hill, with a Foreword by General the Lord Dannatt GCB CBE MC DL, commemorates those who perished in the Great War, 1914-1918. It is inspired by a series of podcasts by the Imperial War Museum in connection with the First World War Centenary Partnership, 2014-2018. There is a poem for each of the podcasts, which totalled 48 at the time of writing, plus a closing poem of grief and reconciliation. The poems are illustrated by a series of sparse, haunting images from the pen of Ian Clark.

Voice of America

A History

Voice of America

For more than sixty years the Voice of America has served as the nations largest publicly funded overseas broadcasting network. This is an "insiders story, " reflecting the transformation of VOA from a propaganda organ to a respected source of information.

Voices of Experience

How Teachers Manage Student-Centered ESL Classes

Voices of Experience

This book is a collection of strategies and tips collected through a survey of 80 practicing ESL professionals, as well as a series of conversations with the author’s colleagues. The book reveals teachers’ motivations for choosing certain techniques. A unique feature of the book is the thinking that underlies teachers’ choices in terms of how they manage their classroom. Voices of Experience was designed and written with teachers-in-training and seasoned professionals in mind; the book would be used differently by each. The book has five units: The Classroom Environment, Lesson Planning, Pair and Group Work, Classroom Interactions, and Classroom Trouble Spots. Each unit has two or three chapters that discuss the survey responses and relevant quotes from participants. Each unit concludes with a Connections section that features: · *Challenging Beliefs: What Teachers Think, which presents a statement for readers to respond to and compare their responses to others who completed the survey. · * Classroom Connections: What Teachers Do, which lists reflection or discussion questions · * Strategies and Motivations: What Teachers Say, which presents more quotes from respondents, particularly those that look at what’s behind teachers’ choices. These too could be used for reflection or discussion.

Forgotten Voices of the Somme

The Most Devastating Battle of the Great War in the Words of Those Who Survived

Forgotten Voices of the Somme

1916. The Somme. With over a million casualties, it was the most brutal battle of World War I. It is a clash that even now, over 90 years later, remains seared into the national consciousness, conjuring up images of muddy trenches and young lives tragically wasted. Its first day, July 1st 1916 - on which the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - is the bloodiest day in the history of the British armed forces to date. On the German side, an officer famously described it as 'the muddy grave of the German field army'. By the end of the battle, the British had learned many lessons in modern warfare while the Germans had suffered irreplaceable losses, ultimately laying the foundations for the Allies' final victory on the Western Front. Drawing on a wealth of material from the vast Imperial War Museum Sound Archive, Forgotten Voices of the Somme presents an intimate, poignant, sometimes even bleakly funny insight into life on the front line: from the day-to-day struggle of extraordinary circumstances to the white heat of battle and the constant threat of injury or death. Featuring contributions from soldiers of both sides and of differing backgrounds, ranks and roles, many of them previously unpublished, this is the definitive oral history of this unique and terrible conflict.

NIV, Voices of Faith Devotional Bible, eBook

Insights from the Past and Present

NIV, Voices of Faith Devotional Bible, eBook

The NIV Voices of Faith Devotional Bible combines Scriptural insights from both the past and present to reveal God’s truth for your life today. Writers such as C.S. Lewis and Eugene Peterson, Oswald Chambers and Joni Eareckson Tada, St. Augustine and Brennan Manning, Thomas à Kempis and Dallas Willard—voices from yesterday and voices from today—join together to address a topic for a timeless and relevant devotional experience every day.

Voices of D-Day

The Story of the Allied Invasion Told by Those Who Were There

Voices of D-Day

In 1983 the Eisenhower Center at the University of New Orleans began a project to record the recollections of as many people as possible -- civilians as well as soldiers -- who were involved in one of the most pivotal events of the century. Skillfully edited by Ronald J. Drez and first published on the fifty-year anniversary of D-Day, the award-winning Voices of D-Day tells the story of that momentous operation almost entirely through the words of the people who were there.

Voices of a Summer Day

A Novel

Voices of a Summer Day

#1 New York Times–bestselling author: On a lazy afternoon in 1964, a Jewish WWII veteran watches his son’s baseball game, and reflects on his past. Benjamin Federov has lived a thoroughly American life. The son of immigrants, husband to a lovely wife, and father to two healthy sons, he is successful in business, and blessed with good health. During a lazy 1964 summer afternoon at his son’s baseball game, Ben reminisces on the triumphs and failures of his past fifty years. He recalls the comedy of his youth and the horrors of World War II, his alienation as a second-generation child in America and the tenderness of his first love. Insightful and evocative, Voices of a Summer Day is an enchanting story about a man’s life and an unforgettable look at the power of memory. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Irwin Shaw including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.

The Voice of the Frontier

John Bradford's Notes on Kentucky

The Voice of the Frontier

From 1826 to 1829, John Bradford, founder of Kentucky's first newspaper, the Kentucky Gazette, reprinted in its pages sixty-six excerpts that he considered important documents on the settlement of the West. Now for the first time all of Bradford's Notes on Kentucky -- the primary historical source for Kentucky's early years -- are made available in a single volume, edited by the state's most distinguished historian. The Kentucky Gazette was established in 1787 to support Kentucky's separation from Virginia and the formation of a new state. Bradford's Notes deal at length with that protracted debate and the other major issues confronting Bradford and his pioneering neighbors. The early white settlers were obsessed with Indian raids, which continued for more than a decade and caused profound anxiety. A second vexing concern was overlapping land claims, as swarms of settlers flowed into the region. And as quickly as the land was settled, newly opened fields began to yield mountains of produce in need of outside markets. Spanish control of the lower Mississippi and rumors of Spain's plan to close the river for twenty-five years were far more threatening to the new economy than the continuing Indian raids. Equally disturbing was the British occupation of the northwest posts from which it was believed the northern Indianraids emanated. Not until Anthony Wayne's sweeping campaign against the Miami villages and the signing of the Treaty of Greenville in 1794 was tension from that quarter relieved. Finally, the Jay Treaty with Britain and the Pinckney Treaty with Spain diplomatically cleared the Kentucky frontier for free expansion of the white populace. John Bradford's Notes on Kentucky, now published together for the first time, deal with all of these pertinent issues. No other source portrays so intimately or so graphically the travail of western settlement.