We Consciousness

33 Profound Truths for Inner and Outer Peace

We Consciousness

After best-selling author Dr. Wayne W. Dyer left the physical plane in 2015, psychic medium Karen Noé began receiving very profound and specific messages from him for his family —and for the world. While Wayne comes through to Karen singularly, he also comes through together with a group of other celestial beings called the We Guides, which includes Saint Francis of Assisi and countless other angels and ascended masters. Wayne and the We Guides share 33 concepts that make up the We Consciousness —and they all point toward your becoming an instrument of peace. In order to extend peace outside of yourself, you must first feel peace within yourself. You must expect to see peace everywhere, and acknowledge the infinite peace that you are. Then you must live that identity to the fullest. After understanding and applying these ideas, you will be able to create miracles in your life and the lives of others as well. You’ll learn how to create heaven right here on earth.

Unlocking the Brain: Volume 2: Consciousness

Unlocking the Brain: Volume 2: Consciousness

Neuroscience has made considerable progress in figuring out how the brain works. We know much about the molecular-genetic and biochemical underpinnings of sensory and motor functions. Recent neuroimaging work has opened the door to investigating the neural underpinnings of higher-order cognitive functions, such as memory, attention, and even free will. In these types of investigations, researchers apply specific stimuli to induce neural activity in the brain and look for the function in question. However, there may be more to the brain and its neuronal states than the changes in activity we induce by applying particular external stimuli. In Volume 2 of Unlocking the Brain, Georg Northoff addresses consciousness by hypothesizing about the relationship between particular neuronal mechanisms and the various phenomenal features of consciousness. Northoff puts consciousness in the context of the resting state of the brain thereby delivering a new point of view to the debate that permits very interesting insights into the nature of consciousness. Moreover, he describes and discusses detailed findings from different branches of neuroscience including single cell data, animal data, human imaging data, and psychiatric findings. This yields a unique and novel picture of the brain, and will have a major and lasting impact on neuroscientists working in neuroscience, psychiatry, and related fields.

Phenomenology and Indian Philosophy

Phenomenology and Indian Philosophy

Addresses not only the basic theme of phenomenology, but its aesthetic, social, psychological, scientific, and technological aspects as well.

The Spectrum of Consciousness

The Spectrum of Consciousness

........Path-Breaking Book......Ken Willber Suceessfully Integrated Various Disciplines Reconciling The Approches Adopted By Western Psychology And Eastern Philosophies To Explore Human Consciousness.Spectrum Of Consciousness Lets In Fresh Air Into Increasingly Polarised Belief SystemsAnd Tunneled Perceptions And Provides Excellent Reading For Anyone Interested In Exploring The Nature Of Human Consciousness And Of His Own Mind.

An Introduction to Existentialism

An Introduction to Existentialism

Indispensable guide, requiring no previous training in philosophy, stresses work of Heidegger and Sartre in an objective examination of the existentialist position. "It genuinely does what its title implies." ― Philosophical Books.

Toward a Science of Consciousness II

The Second Tucson Discussions and Debates

Toward a Science of Consciousness II

This text originates from the second of two conferences discussing the concept of consciousness. In 15 sections, this book demonstrates the broad range of fields now focusing on consciousness.

The Conscious Brain

How Attention Engenders Experience

The Conscious Brain

The problem of consciousness continues to be a subject of great debate in cognitive science. Synthesizing decades of research, The Conscious Brain advances a new theory of the psychological and neurophysiological correlates of conscious experience. Prinz's account of consciousness makes two main claims: first consciousness always arises at a particular stage of perceptual processing, the intermediate level, and, second, consciousness depends on attention. Attention changes the flow of information allowing perceptual information to access memory systems. Neurobiologically, this change in flow depends on synchronized neural firing. Neural synchrony is also implicated in the unity of consciousness and in the temporal duration of experience. Prinz also explores the limits of consciousness. We have no direct experience of our thoughts, no experience of motor commands, and no experience of a conscious self. All consciousness is perceptual, and it functions to make perceptual information available to systems that allows for flexible behavior. Prinz concludes by discussing prevailing philosophical puzzles. He provides a neuroscientifically grounded response to the leading argument for dualism, and argues that materialists need not choose between functional and neurobiological approaches, but can instead combine these into neurofunctional response to the mind-body problem. The Conscious Brain brings neuroscientific evidence to bear on enduring philosophical questions, while also surveying, challenging, and extending philosophical and scientific theories of consciousness. All readers interested in the nature of consciousness will find Prinz's work of great interest.

Doing Phenomenology

Essays on and in Phenomenology

Doing Phenomenology

Substantial encouragement for this volume came from the editors and readers of the Studies for Phenomenological and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) at Northwestern University Press. But its publi cation has been made possible only by the unqualified and un abridged acceptance of the Editorial Board of Phaenomen%gica, which at the time was still headed by its founder, the late Professor H. L. Van Breda, who welcomed the manuscript most generously. This makes his untimely passing even more grievous to me. The stylistic copy editing and proof reading were handled ef ficiently by Ruth Nichols Jackson, secretary of the Philosophy Department. In the proof reading I also had the able help of my colleague Stanley Paulson. I dedicate this book to the memory of my late brother, Dr. chern. Erwin Spiegelberg, at the time of his death assistant professor at the University of Rio de Janeiro, who preceded me by two years in emigrating from Nazi Germany. When in 1938 he put an end to his life in an apparent depression, he also did so in order not to become a burden to his brothers, who were on the point of following him. Whatever I, more privileged in health and in opportunities in the country of my adoption, have been able to do and achieve since then has been done with a sense of a debt to him and of trying to live and work for him too.

A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness

A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness

Bernard Baars suggests a way to specify empirical constraints on a theory of consciousness by contrasting well-established conscious phenomena with comparable unconscious ones, such as stimulus representations known to be preperceptual, unattended or habituated. By adducing data to show that consciousness is associated with a kind of workplace in the nervous system, Baars helps clarify the problem.